Bondage Practices and Psychological Health: New Tips from Research For Dominatrix London

The term Bondage indicates a set of practices related to the theme of domination and submission and is often used, in its broadest and most generic meaning, to indicate the widest range of BDSM practices (Bondage and Discipline, Domination and Submission, Sadism and Masochism ).

Although it is a range of practices and fantasies that concern the experimentation of one’s physical and psychological limits and a particular interpretation of the power associated with pleasure, it should be emphasized how much they are articulated and realized through the clear and explicit definition of a sort of ” code of Conduct”. According to David Stein this type of contract between fans of the genre can be summarized through the English formula “Safe, Sane, Consensual”. It was 1984 and Stein wanted to “distinguish the kind of consensual Sadism and Masochism he was interested in from the abusive, criminal, neurotic and self-destructive one generally associated with the term sadomasochism.”

The term entered the common lexical landscape due to some crime news, usually accidental deaths due to the inexperience of the participants, and there are numerous international scientific studies aimed at studying this phenomenon, both from an individual and a social point of view.

Historically, some important psychoanalytic voices have interpreted BDSM as evidence of an underlying psychopathological condition, with roots in early traumatic experiences (Stolorow, 1975; Valenstein, 1973), in the failed achievement of evolutionary milestones (Bychowsky, 1959; Valenstein, 1973) and in unresolved childhood conflicts (Blum, 1976).

In contrast, Wismeijer and van Assen have published, in the prestigious Journal of Sexual Medicine, the results of a recent research aimed at investigating the psychological characteristics of subjects who practice BDSM.

The scholars compared 902 subjects with behaviors referable to BDSM with a control group on some measures of main psychological dimensions, such as: personality characteristics, attachment styles, sensitivity to being rejected and well-being perceived by the subject. The results suggest that those who practice BDSM have lower levels of neuroticism, are more outgoing, more open to novelty, less sensitive to rejection and with a good general state of psychological well-being. Furthermore, within the BDSM group, more favorable scores were found for those who prefer the dominance side than those who choose the role of submissive.

The conclusion reached by the authors is, therefore, that the characteristics of bondage sexuality do not allow us to hypothesize the presence of an underlying pathological nucleus per se, but that they can be interpreted primarily as playful and recreational choices by the person.

In summary, we could say that Sado-maso practices, currently very fashionable, do not necessarily fall under paraphilias or sexual perversions.

The discriminating element is the exclusivity of this behavior: when a person is unable to access their erotic desire except through such a ritual, one can imagine that there is a psychopathological problem. When, on the other hand, it is a playful experimentation but there is a personal eroticism that is independent of these practices, then the old psychoanalytic and psychiatric categories may have no foundation.

Then there is a phenomenon driven by operations such as “50 shades of gray”: the bestseller with unexpected proportions has trivialized both the world of BDSM and the psychology of the individual and the couple through the unlikely protagonists! A childhood trauma determines the sadistic eroticism of the rich and fascinating young man who involves our heroine in the old female role of “I’ll save you”. The happy end is guaranteed only after putting the reader’s masochism to the test: three interminable volumes of boring embraces and sentimental push and pull. But it has sold millions of copies and that will mean something.

In a world where everything gets bored quickly, Verdone was really right when he winked – with his “Famolo weird!” – to the modern and somewhat naive vision of a free sex, in search of spicy emotions and strong stimuli. Very strong.

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